Latest Comments

 

I'm sharing this with my course students. It's so brilliant! I have a question: Can you dive deeper into why critical thinking skills are the most/more important? I'd love to understand that part more. Thank you for writing such a lovely piece! I agree about reading SO MUCH!!!! Lauren =) - Lauren Holliday on Can Good Writing Be Taught? on 2/18/18 @ 2:50

 


 

The beauty of this story made me feel as though I was part of a historic event. Renee, anyone who reads this story can totally resonate with your word play. It has in-depth feeling and very touching. Loved it....Thank you - Susan M on Sliver of Joy on 2/10/18 @ 5:44

 


 

I think this is an interesting piece and does hold some truth to it. However, as a member of the LGBTQ community, I couldn’t help but notice a few lines. First off, in one of the first few paragraphs, when the author is describing the current state of the literary world and how it looks down upon Christian writers, he says, “It’s fine to write from a Christian perspective, provided you’re not too obvious about it and don’t try to convert people. It’s a “don’t ask, don’t tell” kind of world in the publishing industry, and many writers of faith have taken on that attitude themselves.” I couldn’t help but notice that this is a direct parallel to how the gay community has had to adapt because of religious persecution (including that of Christianity.) The first line to really hit me was, “It’s fine to write from a Christian perspective, provided you’re not too obvious about it and don’t try to convert people.” Memories of my time growing up in Catholic school rushed into my head. In our religion class we were always taught: God is upset with you for being gay, but he’s willing to forgive you as long as you never act upon it. When I got to the line, “It’s a “don’t ask, don’t tell” kind of world in the publishing industry, and many writers of faith have taken on that attitude themselves,” I had to stop and pause. I felt a wave of anger rush over me. This anger came because, once again, things like Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell are the direct result of the Christian persecution of the LGBTQ community. A sharp sting went down my spine knowing that this term…a term created by religious intolerance…was now being used as a means to draw sympathy for the religious community. Further into the article, I noticed more parallels to the gay community with lines like, “Don’t announce your faith, but let people discover it…” and, “This approach encourages writers of faith to bury what they believe in their books like a secret code that only the initiated will understand…” Both of these lines perfectly describe how “Closet Culture” started in the gay community. The result of society telling gay men not to announce your sexuality, but to keep it solely in your bedroom. And with the LGBTQ community having to keep everything secretive for fear of persecution, they too had to create “secret codes that only the initiated would understand.” The old stereotype of the gross gay man tapping his foot underneath some stall in a public bathroom, or groups of men meeting up in parks to engage in sexual activity…These weren’t the products of gay men being perverted and enjoying getting off in public. This was the secret code they had to create because society wouldn’t let them meet and mingle publically. “Cruising” is full of these secret codes. It was how the LGBTQ community would know if they were engaging with other members of the community or not. And this entire culture was the product of a Christian nation making laws and forming cultural norms based on their religious beliefs. What I will say though, is that I understand where this author is coming from. It’s awful and unfair when people tell you to suppress yourself, in whatever way that may be. The question that I have in my mind though is this: What if the reason why so many people these days look down on Christianity these days, is because they’re tired of the archaic notions it holds and its history of being used to persecute groups? If that’s the case, then where do we go from here? - Keith on That Kind of Book on 2/8/18 @ 9:36

 


 

Thats great! Love ya Aunt Nee - Errol scott on Sliver of Joy on 2/4/18 @ 9:53

 


 

This is so beautiful! Thank you! - Nicole Gionet on Sliver of Joy on 2/4/18 @ 7:06

 


 

Thank you for this beautiful story of faith, courage and relationship. Deeply touching. - Catherine Conway on My Father’s Blessing on 2/4/18 @ 11:04

 


 

Evelyn, thank you for your words and for this quote. It speaks so much to the challenges of writing about a past that is particularly painful. - Mercedes Lucero on Something Like Sand on 1/25/18 @ 11:05

 


 

Mercedes, this piece so eloquently expresses how grief, whether fully embraced or not, can take away our words. During my tragic loss, I did not experience numbness, but I couldn't speak well or write for a long time afterward. Eventually, I found my words by writing in bits and pieces, by exploring the fragments rather than trying to capture the big picture. Here is a quote that guided and inspired me: “While trauma keeps us dumbfounded, the path out of it is paved with words, carefully assembled, piece by piece, until the whole story can be revealed.” – Bessel Van Der Kolk, M.D., The Body Keeps the Score - Evelyn Krieger on Something Like Sand on 1/24/18 @ 11:30

 


 

Love. Love. Love! Truth telling plus surrealism plus lycanthropy..and SALT. This is everything. - Nora Snyder on Application for the Post of Lesser Poet Laureate on 12/19/17 @ 8:53

 


 

Quite wonderful! (The piece definitely makes a mark, one way or another.) - Steven Lewis on Application for the Post of Lesser Poet Laureate on 12/18/17 @ 12:11